User Experience Designer
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In My Shoes

It's said you don’t truly know someone it'll you’ve walked in their shoes. But imagine if you could...

In My Shoes is a virtual reality computer simulation platform designed to build empathy on an array of disorders & diseases by experiencing the another's world for a brief moment in time. You'll see the world as they do and internalize how they feel.

In My Shoes (Part 1) is designed to educate about Severe Depression, Anxiety Disorders & PTSD to educators, non-profits and loved ones. It was in development for over 16 months & vetted in an intense startup incubator program jointly ran by multiple Philadelphia universities. It can be played with advanced immersion technologies such as the Oculus Rift and Leap Motion, bringing a level of realism books and film never could.

The final open beta to the simulation can be downloaded @ https://github.com/GeekyMoore/InMyShoes/releases

All code used in the development is being pushed online so that others may continue what I started @ https://github.com/GeekyMoore/InMyShoes

Research documentation can be found @ http://www.bamoore.com/in-my-shoes-research-process

All work is registered under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International.

In My Shoes (IMS) is a virtual reality computer simulation program designed to build empathy on an array of disorders & diseases by experiencing the another's world for a brief moment in time. You see the world as they do and internalize how they feel by means of bio-feedback mechanics and VR immersion with the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive, bringing a level of realism books and film never could. IMS (Part 1) is designed to educate about Severe Depression, Anxiety Disorders & PTSD to educators, non-profits and loved ones. It was in development for over 16 months & vetted in an intense startup incubator program jointly ran by multiple Philadelphia universities.

 

Development was done within the Unity gaming engine with assistance from Maya for modeling needs. IDE coding was done via MonoDevelop with JS and C#. Most of the code written for the open beta (as shown to public) was self written. Various, but few, interactive elements had assistance gained from 3rd parties such as the waypoint system.